FEED TWITTER

Timeline

The Grand National has a rich history. Here’s a timeline of all the key events in the race’s history.

  • 1836 – The Duke won the inaugural Great Liverpool Steeplechase, which would be later renamed the Grand National.
  • 1905 – Kirkland, based in Pembrokeshire, is the only winner to be trained in Wales.
  • 1923 – Sergeant Murphy became the first American-bred horse to win the Grand National.
  • 1926 – William Watkinson recorded the first riding success for Australia. The Tasmanian-born rider was killed at Bogside in Scotland less than three weeks later.
  • 1927 – The first BBC radio commentary of the race, by Meyrick Good and George Allison.
  • 1934 – The only horse to win the Cheltenham Gold Cup and Grand National in the same season – Golden Miller.
  • 1938 – The American-bred Battleship, son of the famous Man o’ War, became the first (and so far only) horse to have won both the Grand National and the American Grand National (won four years earlier).
  • 1951 – Nickel Coin is the 13th and last mare to win the race.
  • 1956 – Devon Loch, owned by the Queen Mother and ridden by Dick Francis, was in the lead and certain to win when he inexplicably leapt and unseated the jockey on the run-in, 50 yards (45 m) from the finish, giving victory to E.S.B.
  • 1960 – The race was televised for the first time. Since then it has always been shown by the BBC.
  • 1961 – The most recent grey horse to win the race – Nicolaus Silver. The only previous grey to win was The Lamb (1868 and 1871).
  • 1962 – Wyndburgh finished runner-up for the third time, but was never to win the race.
  • 1967 – A pile up at the 23rd fence held up many horses in the race, allowing 100/1 outsider, Foinavon, to win.
  • 1968 – The favourite for the race, Different Class, was owned by actor Gregory Peck.
  • 1975 – The second Cheltenham Gold Cup winner to win the Grand National – L’Escargot.
  • 1977 – Red Rum’s third victory in the Grand National.
  • 1977 – The first female jockey rode in the race. Charlotte Brew rode 200/1 shot Barony Fort, who refused at the fourth fence from home.
  • 1979 – Rubstic, based in Roxburghshire, was the first winner to be trained in Scotland.
  • 1981 – Bob Champion, who had been diagnosed with cancer and told he only had months to live in 1979, was the winning jockey on Aldaniti, who had almost been retired because of leg trouble. A film was made of their story entitled Champions.
  • 1982 – The first female jockey to complete the race – Geraldine Rees, finished 8th (last) on 66/1 outsider Cheers.
  • 1983 – The first woman to train the winner – Jenny Pitman, with Corbiere.
  • 1990 – Jockey Chris Grant came second in the race for the third time (previous years were 1986 and 1988).
  • 1991 – The race was won by a horse called Seagram – coincidentally the race was sponsored at the time by the company Seagram. The company had previous chances to buy the horse.
  • 1992 – Party Politics won the race just five days before the 1992 UK General Election. Carl Llewellyn got his winning ride only because the horse’s regular jockey Andrew Adams was injured. In 1998 he got another winning ride, this time because of an injury to that horse’s regular jockey, Tom Jenks.
  • 1993 – The race was declared void after many of the riders did not hear the starter’s recall. The first horse past the post was Esha Ness, ridden by John White.
  • 1997 – The delayed race (rescheduled 48 hours later after a suspected IRA bomb threat) was the last of 50 Nationals (including the void race of 1993) to be commentated on by Peter O’Sullevan.
  • 2001 – Richard Guest’s winning ride on Red Marauder subsequently won the Lester Award for “Jump Ride of the Year”.
  • 2005 – The race was moved back by 25 minutes owing to the wedding of Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles.
  • 2009Mon Mome, trained by Venetia Williams, became the longest price winner since Foinavon in 1967 at 100/1.